Everything You Need to Know About COVID-19 & Down Syndrome | Global Down Syndrome Foundation

Everything You Need to Know About COVID-19 & Down Syndrome

WE NEED YOUR URGENT HELP TODAY!!

The State of Colorado will be finalizing the Critical Care Triage Guidelines for the State of Colorado (“Guidelines”) in the next day. The Guidelines MUST ensure that there is NO MEDICAL RATIONING of COVID-19 that would discriminate against people with disabilities and/or our most vulnerable citizens!

PLEASE TAKE ACTION IMMEDIATELY BY CLICKING HERE!

In the Face of Ethical Aberrations in Several States, Colorado Stands Strong
Against Discrimination
in COVID-19 Care

READ THE LATEST PRESS RELEASE HERE

 

Campaign: Help Save Lives
Graphic of many disability and social justice organizations


Most people with Down syndrome are at “high risk” for COVID-19 because they have certain underlying medical conditions such as sleep apnea. GLOBAL has contributed to these important resources to help answer your questions:
READ/DOWNLOAD THE LONG Q&A HERE: READ/DOWNLOAD THE SHORT Q&A HERE: READ MORE ABOUT RATIONING CARE:
Download the Expanded COVID-19 and Down Syndrome Q & A Here
Download the Abbreviated COVID-19 and Down Syndrome Q & A Here
Read more about rationing care and how it affects the disabled community
En español –
Versión Ampliada
  En español –
Versión Abreviada
Un agradecimiento especial a Jesus Florez, MD PhD, and Presidente, Fundación Iberoamericana Down21, por proporcionar la traducción y
Dra. Macarena Lizama, Directora Ejecutiva, Centro UC Síndrome de Down
 

 
 
Global Down Syndrome Foundation Offers Important Information about Coronavirus COVID-19 and Down Syndrome
A Message to Our Family, Friends, Colleagues & Supporters

Global and our affiliates have received numerous inquiries about whether or not people with Down syndrome are more at risk than typical people when it comes to exposure to the COVID-19 coronavirus.

Many inquiries are related to health risks and many are also related to spring break travel on planes. With COVID-19 coronavirus being categorized as an official pandemic by the World Health Organization, and after discussing with our affiliates, at this moment in time we are comfortable providing the following information.

At Global, we recognize that every family and individual has their unique situation, and we stand ready to support you where we can. Please let us know if you have any questions or suggestions. In the meantime please be safe!

Sincerely,
Michelle Sie Whitten and the Global/Affiliate Team

Download Global's Info Sheet about COVID-19 Coronavirus

COVID-19 Important Resources

Up-to-Date Coronavirus Stats by the Numbers

Coronavirus by the Numbers
Updated by the Hour – Stay up to date on the world’s reported coronavirus cases and statistics by country

The Latest updates from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

The Latest updates from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)
Updated Daily – Stay up to date on the latest information regarding symptoms, preparation, protecting yourself, and more

Important Information about Coronavirus COVID-19 and Down Syndrome from Experts

NDSC Board President’s Coronavirus Interviews
3/31/2020 – Listen to podcasts on COVID-19 outbreak, featuring NDSC President & Director of the Western Pennsylvania Down Syndrome Center, Dr. Kishore Vellody, and infectious disease expert, Dr. Andrew Nowalk. Part 1 (3/10) here & Part 2 (3/31) here

NDSC Webinar Online Learning from Home

NDSC Online Webinar Series
3/31/2020 – Check out NDSC’s 3-part Parent Webinar Series on online learning, featuring Sean J. Smith, professor of Special Education at the University of Kansas and NDSC Board member.

Travel Considerations for People with Down Syndrome (COVID-19)

Travel Considerations for People with Down syndrome
3/2020 – A lead author on Global’s Medical Care Guidelines for Adults with Down syndrome, Dr. Brian Chicoine, discusses important travel considerations for individuals with DS during the outbreak

Work and Activity Considerations for People with Down Syndrome (COVID-19)

Work & Activity Considerations for People with Down syndrome
3/2020 – Dr. Brian Chicoine, discusses important work and activity considerations for individuals with Down syndrome during the outbreak

Recommendations for High Risk Individuals

Recommendations for High Risk Individuals
3/20/2020 – What the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends for sickness prevention

COVID-19 and Pediatric Care

COVID-19 & Pediatric Care
3/19/2020 – A pediatrician and mother of a child with Down syndrome, Dr. Abbie Smith, shares what parents need to know about Coronavirus

Education for Your Child During COVID-19

Education for Your Child During COVID-19
3/12/2020 – A Q&A from the Department of Education discusses best practices for continuing education for children with disabilities During COVID-19

Visual Learning Curriculum at Home

Visual Learning Curriculum at Home
A useful resource for parents and educators to create visual checklists and schedules for children, created by the N.J. Coalition for Inclusive Education

15 Rules for Stopping the Spread of the Coronavirus

15 Rules for Non-Profits Facing COVID-19
3/17/2020 – Click here to see Guidelines/Rules for preventing the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19), set forth by the White House & Center for Disease Control and Prevention

 


GLOBAL PRESIDENT & CEO DISCUSSES COVID-19 & WORLD DOWN SYNDROME DAY

HELPFUL SAFETY TIPS



 
GLOBAL UPDATE ON THE COVID-19 CORONAVIRUS

    1. Are all people with Down syndrome “High Risk”?
    2. While there is no evidence about how people with Down syndrome are affected by coronavirus versus the typical population, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Center for Disease Control (CDC) have categorized certain groups of people as “high risk” in terms of how coronavirus can negatively affect their health:

      a. Older adults

      b. People who have serious chronic medical conditions like: Heart disease, Diabetes, Obesity, Lung disease, and/or Respiratory Difficulties

    3. Some Precautions to Consider from the NIH & CDC:
    4. We do know that people with Down syndrome are more likely than typical people to have such chronic medical conditions listed above, and as such, following the NIH and CDC precautions should be considered. You can read about those precautions on the NIH and CDC government websites. For individuals considered “high risk” the websites both recommend “Avoid all non-essential travel including plane trips, and especially avoid embarking on cruise ships” amongst many other recommendations.

    5. Extra Precautions to Consider Based on Research

    There is research from the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics that points to people with Down syndrome being more likely to develop complications due to respiratory viral infections including H1N1 and RSV, and increased rates of hospitalization. Given this research, if you as an individual with Down syndrome, your child with Down syndrome, or your dependent adult with Down syndrome has a respiratory infection, is just recovering from a respiratory infection, has chronic respiratory issues or pulmonary viral infections, you may want to consider taking the same precautions that would apply to someone who is “high risk.”

     
    Some Basic But Important CDC and NIH recommendations to Consider

    1. Avoid close contact and stay home when sick – Read about steps to preventing the illness via the CDC website:

    • Stay home when you are feeling sick (e.g. fever, cough, itchy throat, chills, etc.).
    • Notify a healthcare provider if you are experiencing symptoms.
    • Put in extra measures to put more physical distance between yourself and others.

    2. Practice good hygiene. Read about the importance of handwashing via the CDC website. Below are some highlights:

    • Wash your hands with soap and water regularly for 20 seconds.
    • Practice cough and sneezing etiquette, always cover your mouth and nose when sneezing, coughing with a tissue or into the crook of your elbow.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.