Archive for the ‘Blog’ Category

Babies with Down syndrome take center stage in the US abortion fight

March 5th, 2018 by Global Down Syndrome Foundation

Washington Post

Amid this debate, the Global Down Syndrome Foundation’s Whitten said it is important to separate facts from myths about the condition. . . 
 
But today, thanks to medical advances and better integration into society, many individuals with Down syndrome live long, productive and happy lives. The average life span among people with Down syndrome has more than doubled from 25 years in 1983 to about 60 years, Whitten said. And while most have a mild to moderate range of intellectual impairment, there is wide variation in their abilities, and more and more are living independently, going to college, holding challenging jobs and getting married. . . 
 
Whitten said that one of the biggest challenges people with the condition face is a precipitous drop in research funding over the years from the National Institutes of Health, a decline that, she said, makes Down syndrome the most poorly funded major genetic condition in the United States. . .
 
 

Global CALLS OUT NETFLIX for anti-disability,
anti-Down syndrome rhetoric

January 19th, 2018 by Global Down Syndrome Foundation

With the #Metoo movement in full swing and the 1st Anniversary of the Women’s March looming, it’s shocking to see Netflix promoting its newest stand-up show aptly called “Disgraceful.”   Netflix promotes the show by claiming its comedian “…gives voice to the sordid thoughts you’d never say out loud, with blunt musings on porn, parking lot power struggles, parenthood and more.”

Apparently sordid thoughts about the disabled and people with Down syndrome are fair game. In fact, the show’s anti-disability sketch was deemed so funny by Netflix that it is used in their trailer. 

At the Global Down Syndrome Foundation we are grateful for the freedoms we have in the US – including freedom of speech.  AND YET, we also believe there are words that we are free to use, but as a society choose not to use because they are so directly tied to violence against a vulnerable population.  I would argue the ‘R’ word is exactly such a word – witness Willowbrook, NY to Pueblo, CO today.  The best essay I have read on this subject is written by our board member and renowned actor, John. C. McGinley (after you read it you will have a “Captain My Captain” moment).

Sometimes it is hard to advocate.  I’m a working mom, I’m perpetually tired so I get it. But we can all take a moment to post, like, share, or petition.  And WHY NOT demand Netflix to:

  • Edit out the anti-disability and anti-Down syndrome rhetoric in the show?  
  • Immediately take the appalling sketch out of their trailer?
  • Issue an apology for failing to use humanity as the demarcation line for comedic depravity?

What we are asking for is NOT too much or too difficult.  There are lots of depraved topics that are funny (disclosure – I’m half NJ Italian) that don’t lend themselves to violence or oppression.  So, you can still get that cheap laugh and feel good about yourself. 

It’s time to call folks out. Seriously, we have nothing to lose. 

Michelle Sie Whitten, President and CEO, Global Down Syndrome Foundation

Read John C. McGinley’s essay, Spread the Word to End the Word

Read full article on The Mighty

DENVER  |  The Global Down Syndrome Foundation announced today that it has translated important prenatal testing information into Icelandic and provided the resource to the Icelandic Down Syndrome Association. The translation is a first step to support the association’s efforts in providing accurate information about Down syndrome to pregnant women and families in Iceland.

Global and the National Down Syndrome Congress (NDSC) offered to provide the translation of their recently published Prenatal Testing & Information About Down Syndrome following a CBS news report in August about the termination rates of Down syndrome pregnancies in Iceland.

According to the report, “Since prenatal screening tests were introduced in Iceland in the early 2000s, the vast majority of women — close to 100 percent — who received a positive test for Down syndrome terminated their pregnancy.” In actuality, from 2007 to 2015, nearly 85% of pregnant women opted for Down syndrome screening and, of those who received an amniocentesis resulting in a positive test result for Down syndrome, 100% terminated.

The best available statistics in the U.S. are that an estimated 67 percent of women who receive an amniocentesis resulting in a positive test result for Down syndrome choose to terminate their pregnancies. But more than 95 percent of pregnant women don’t even elect to receive an amniocentesis.

“The high termination rates in Iceland are alarming,” said Michelle Sie Whitten, President and CEO of the Global Down Syndrome Foundation. “Every woman and every pregnancy is unique, but every woman should be given the facts including examples of how people with Down syndrome can and are contributing to society and reaching their potential. In the U.S. the situation is very different than Iceland – there is actually a population explosion of people with Down syndrome because of increased births and a more than doubling of the lifespan. Our problem is that funding for research and medical care has declined precipitously over the last two decades and we need to change that.”

“Global has been such a great partner to work with on our prenatal testing pamphlet and we are so pleased to offer it in Icelandic,” said David Tolleson, Executive Director of the NDSC. “The NDSC is offering scholarships to families from Iceland to attend our national convention in July of this year, and we believe it will serve as a great resource for people from Iceland to bring some best practices back to their country. We also look forward to learning from our colleagues in Iceland.”

“We appreciate Global and NDSC for extending support to the Down syndrome community in Iceland. Their generosity and moral support is very important for a small society as ours. And how wonderful to be part of this larger Down syndrome family, all sharing the same beliefs and hopes for people with Down syndrome,” said the Icelandic Down Syndrome Association President, Thordis Ingadóttir.

Watch C-Span cover the 5-minute testimony of Global Down Syndrome Foundation’s Quincy Jones Award Advocate, Frank Stephens, about Iceland and the future of people with Down syndrome.

Below are several trends associated with Down syndrome based on data in the United States:

  • Population – ranges between 230,000-430,000
  • Live Births – have increased to 1 in 691 today from 1 in 1,000 in 2002
  • Lifespan –There have been great strides in medical care and lifespan has more than doubled to 60 years from 28 years in the 1980s
  • Low Government Funding – Despite being the leading cause of developmental delay in the U.S. and the world, Down syndrome is one of the least funded genetic conditions by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and has been since 2001.
  • Education – By law, people with Down syndrome must be provided a free, appropriate education through their public school system.
  • Societal Trends – A small but growing number of people with Down syndrome are choosing to live independently, participate in post-secondary education or college programs, and get married.

For the most current, accurate information and resources associated with people with Down syndrome visit www.globaldownsyndrome.org/facts. 

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About the Global Down Syndrome Foundation

The Global Down Syndrome Foundation is at the forefront of research, medical care, education and advocacy dedicated to significantly improving the lives of people with Down syndrome. Supporting the research of hundreds of scientists around the world, and through our advocates, partners and affiliates including the Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the Anna and John J. Sie Center for Down Syndrome, Global is making an impact on the lives of people with Down syndrome today, and remains focused on finding solutions tomorrow. We are committed to helping people with Down syndrome realize their fullest potential and to lead healthy and productive lives. To learn more, visit www.globaldownsyndrome.org.

Be Beautiful Be Yourself Dancers to Perform in “Nutcracker”

December 2nd, 2017 by Global Down Syndrome Foundation

Colorado Ballet Academy Students with Cora Jane and Kristina

Two ballet students from the Global Down Syndrome Foundation’s Be Beautiful Be Yourself Dance Class have been cast by the Colorado Ballet for their official production of the holiday classic “The Nutcracker.”  Both students are part of the ensemble of children partygoers and will have plenty of stage time to show off their dance skills and shine!

Global’s star student, Cora Jane Thompson, will perform in the Thursday, Dec. 7th, showing and star student, Kristina Penfield, will perform in the Thursday, Dec. 14th showing. Both students will perform in the prime time 7:30pm showing of The Nutcracker at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th Street in Denver.

Please support Global’s star students and our partner, the Colorado Ballet, by purchasing tickets to The Nutcracker performances on Thursday December 7th and Thursday December 14th at 7:30pm!!

The Global Down Syndrome Foundation’s Be Beautiful Be Yourself Dance Program is made possible by generous grants from the Melvin & Elaine Wolf Foundation, The Daniels Fund, and the Anna and John J. Sie Foundation.

Global is deeply grateful to its program donors and to our partners – the Colorado Ballet and the Sie Center for Down Syndrome at Children’s Hospital Colorado.  Our Be Beautiful Be Yourself Dance Class runs for two seasons a year. Each 16 week season is taught by Colorado Ballet professionals alongside Sie Center physical therapists and educators.  The program provides instruction on ballet movement, music appreciation, rhythm and basic dance steps as well as interpersonal skills, vocabulary and confidence building to students ages 5-14 who happen to have Down syndrome.

The program is designed as both a confidence builder to dance classes with typical peers and as a stand-alone dance class that gives students with Down syndrome the opportunity to make friends who also have the condition.

Over 30% of our students are scholarship recipients – to support the Be Beautiful Be Yourself Dance Class and our students in need, please make a donation today!

Congratulations, Cora Jane and Kristina! We are so proud of how hard you worked to be cast in The Nutcracker!  GOOD LUCK! We know you will SHINE!

 

Colorado Ballet Dancers Mackenzie Dessens and Gregory K. Gonzales with Kristina and Cora Jane

 

Colorado Ballet Studio Company Dancers with Kristina and Cora Jane


Watch our dancers featured on CBS 4 Denver here!


Watch our dancers featured on Colorado’s Best on Fox 31 here!


A SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR PROGRAM SUPPORTERS


 

A SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR PROGRAM PARTNERS


 

A SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR IN-KIND DONORS


Generous $1 million grant will help establish a much-needed education center at Global’s new international HQ in Denver 

Salah Foundation

Media Contacts:
Kathy Green | kgreen@globaldownsyndrome.org | (720) 280-9725
Anca Call | acall@globaldownsyndrome.org | (720) 320-3832

DENVER – The Global Down Syndrome Foundation (Global) today announced a transformative lead gift of $1 million from The Salah Foundation. Combined with the generous $1 million grant, Global will receive additional matching funds that will help to establish a center in Denver dedicated to educational activities primarily for people with Down syndrome but also for others who are differently-abled.

The gift was unveiled by Noreen Salah Burpee, executive director of The Salah Foundation, at Global’s annual record-breaking Be Beautiful Be Yourself Fashion Show held on Nov. 11, 2017, at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel. The announcement brought a crowd of more than 1,300 including advocates with Down syndrome, their families, friends, supporters, and celebrities Quincy Jones, Jamie Foxx, DeOndra Dixon, Marisa Tomei, Joe Manganiello, John C. McGinley, Matt Dillon and Eva Longoria to their feet.

“We are so grateful for The Salah Foundation and Noreen for making this generous and impactful gift to the Global Down Syndrome Foundation,” said John C. McGinley, award-winning actor and Global board member after hearing the announcement backstage at the fashion show. “The team at Global works hard and is truly delivering for the Down syndrome community. This will allow them to reach even more people.”

“We are thrilled to support the work of the Global Down Syndrome Foundation as they continue to create extraordinary change in the lives of people with Down syndrome and their families,” said Salah Burpee. “We hope that others will follow suit and open their hearts and wallets to this important project.”

The education center will be housed in Global’s new international headquarters in Denver in the Cherry Creek Shopping North – one of the most popular districts in Colorado with the fastest growing foot traffic. It is anticipated that the multi-use education center will provide cooking classes, computer labs and other center-based educational programs for varying ages and abilities and will open sometime in the second half of 2018.

Global supports the research of hundreds of scientists around the world and helped establish the first and only academic home for Down syndrome research at the Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus, with a focus on Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and autoimmune disorders.

Global funding also helps provide the highest quality of comprehensive medical care to thousands of children with Down syndrome from around the world through the Sie Center for Down Syndrome at Children’s Hospital Colorado, coordinating medical care, along with therapies including speech, physical and occupational therapy.

“We are grateful for the continued support of The Salah Foundation as we advance our mission,” said Michelle Sie Whitten, president and CEO of the Global Down Syndrome Foundation. “Noreen, Fred, Megan and the whole Salah family have believed in our work, provided us guidance to expand, and now have given us this extraordinary gift that simultaneously increases our impact on people with Down syndrome and helps ensure my parents’ legacy. I can’t tell you how meaningful that is to us.”

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About The Salah Foundation

The Salah Foundation is a private foundation, by invitation only, that supports non-profit organizations in the United States that strengthen families and communities and advances individuals to become productive and responsible citizens. There is a special interest in education, medical research, community development, and self-sufficiency programs aimed at the economically disadvantaged, the young, the elderly and the disabled. To learn more, visit www.salahfoundation.org. 

About the Global Down Syndrome Foundation

The Global Down Syndrome Foundation is at the forefront of research, medical care, education and advocacy dedicated to significantly improving the lives of people with Down syndrome. Supporting the research of hundreds of scientists around the world, and through our advocates, partners, and affiliates including the Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the Anna and John J. Sie Center for Down Syndrome, Global is making an impact on the lives of people with Down syndrome today, and remain focused on finding solutions tomorrow. We are committed to helping people with Down syndrome realize their fullest potential and lead healthy and productive lives. To learn more, visit. www.globaldownsyndrome.org.

National Down Syndrome Adoption Network

November 6th, 2017 by Global Down Syndrome Foundation

All Children Deserve The Safety And Security Of A Loving Home.

In 1981, Robin and David Steele visited a children’s home in Cincinnati and fell in love with a little girl named Martha. After initially being told Martha was not available for adoption because she w as born with Down syndrome, the Steeles persisted — both adopting Martha and establishing the National Down Syndrome Adoption Network (NDSAN) so no other child with Down syndrome would ever be considered “unadoptable.”


This article was published in the award-winning Down Syndrome World™ magazine. Become a member to read all the articles and get future issues delivered to your door!

FOREVER HOMES
A program of the Down Syndrome Association of Greater Cincinnati (DSAGC), NDSAN is a free registry (not an adoption agency) that connects birth and adoptive families across the U.S. The Steeles — who eventually adopted four more children with Down syndrome and six other children who are differently-abled — recently stepped back from the organization but are still committed supporters. Since 2010, NDSAN has been under the capable leadership of Stephanie Thompson, who spent the previous 11 years working for DSAGC.

When birth parents call NDSAN, Thompson answers their questions and provides educational resources about raising children with Down syndrome to help allay any fears that might accompany the diagnosis. If they decide to give a child up for adoption, she helps them develop a birth plan.

Families interested in adopting a child with Down syndrome can contact NDSAN after completing a home study. Thompson then searches NDSAN’s database for children who might be a good fit. Children with Down syndrome often have unique medical and developmental needs, and it is important that the family be a good fit for the child and vice versa. Thompson also helps get an adoption agency involved, if necessary, and continues to provide support after a child joins his or her new family.

“I can empathize with both adoptive and birth parents,” said Thompson, who has a 25-year-old son with Down syndrome. “I know how it feels to get a diagnosis of Down syndrome, and through that connection, birth parents feel comfortable asking me questions. If they want to make an adoption plan, I have a wonderful relationship with all of the adoptive families on our registry, whom I’m helping as well. It means the world to me these folks feel called to adopt a child with Down syndrome.”

“When we first learned of our son’s condition, we felt that there was little choice for us,” one family wrote in a letter to Thompson. “We may have made a very different decision if it w as not for your organization.”

EDUCATION AND OUTREACH

Thompson wants everyone involved in the adoption process to have the most up-to-date information about Down syndrome, and that includes medical professionals. NDSAN publishes booklets for healthcare providers so they can educate patients about all their options.

“If termination is talked about, we want adoption talked about as well,” she said.

She’s also reaching out to Down syndrome organizations that can help spread the word to members about both adoption and the many foster children with Down syndrome in their areas looking for forever homes.

“This can be a very emotional job,” Thompson said.

“But I can’t imagine doing anything else.”

Each year, the National Down Syndrome Adoption Network is contacted by approximately 125 expectant families, birth families, and agencies and helps 40 children find their adoptive families.

The article was published in Down Syndrome World™ magazine. Become a member to read the whole magazine and get future magazines delivered to your door!

$2.5 million initial commitment to launch project

DENVER –The Global Down Syndrome Foundation today announced that Biogen, a neuroscience leader has joined the Global Down Syndrome Foundation and the University of Colorado School of Medicine in a groundbreaking project that explores the connection between Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome.

The Crnic Institute Human Trisome ProjectTM (HTP) is an ambitious longitudinal and cross-sectional study that will recruit 1,000 individuals with Down syndrome (also known as Trisomy 21) and 500 typical individuals. Scientists and clinicians will sequence and study several layers of genomics information (all de-identified) from a single sample of blood. Saliva, stool and other samples are also being collected. The Crnic Institute HTP has already begun to significantly increase the speed of Down syndrome research and has enrolled nearly 300 participants in the first 11 months.

“People with Down syndrome have a different disease spectrum,” said Dr. Joaquín Espinosa, executive director of the Crnic Institute, and the principal investigator of the Crnic Institute HTP. “The Crnic Institute HTP will allow us to redefine Down syndrome from the least scientifically understood condition to one of the best understood conditions. In addition, it will provide unprecedented understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, autoimmune conditions, cancers and other medical conditions that people with Down syndrome are either very predisposed to or protected from, eventually enabling the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools.”

“This research will serve first and foremost people with Down syndrome, but also the millions of individuals without Down syndrome who are affected by the many medical conditions modulated by trisomy 21,” said Espinosa.

Biogen has committed more than $500,000 and additional in-kind resources to the Crnic Institute HTP to investigate the genome and epigenome of specific cell types in the blood that could inform the development of Alzheimer’s disease. This initial investment is being financed with funds from Biogen and $1 million from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus – home to the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome – with a matching gift of $1 million from the Global Down Syndrome Foundation.

“Down syndrome is still one of the least funded genetic conditions of the federal government, so we are extremely grateful for the commitment from CU and Biogen,” said Michelle Sie Whitten, president & CEO of the Global Down Syndrome Foundation. “This is just the beginning as we hope to attract other biopharmaceutical organizations and philanthropists committed to improving the lives of people with Down syndrome and other conditions.”

“The School of Medicine provides a home for outstanding biomedical research that leads to improved care for all,” said Dr. John J. Reilly, Jr., vice chancellor for health affairs and dean of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “We are confident that this investment will have a significant impact on our understanding of the health of people with Down syndrome and that it will lead to discoveries informing the care we provide.”

“Our son is 38 years old and we are concerned that he may get Alzheimer’s,” said Jack and Penni Dorwart, whose son participated in the Crnic Institute HTP.  “We also know that if we have high- quality research that there is the potential to significantly improve not only our son’s life but millions of others with Down syndrome who have many other medical issues that prevent good quality of life. That is why we participated in this study and we encourage others to do the same. We are grateful to the Crnic Institute and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation for taking on this difficult work and advocating for our children and adults.”

Learn more about in the Crnic Institute Human Trisome ProjectTM or sign up to participate in the study.

DENVER
Michelle Sie Whitten, President and CEO of the Global Down Syndrome Foundation released the following statement today regarding the recent CBSN story on ‘eradicating’ Down syndrome in Iceland:

“It’s heartbreaking to see what is happening in Iceland today, and shocking to see that this level of misinformation and discrimination against people with Down syndrome still exists. While every mother and every pregnancy is unique, the fact is those born with Down syndrome can and do live long, happy and productive lives. Women making these critical decisions need to have the facts.

Educating the medical community and pregnant women with accurate and current information about Down syndrome is imperative. Global Down Syndrome Foundation and the National Down Syndrome Congress recently updated their Prenatal Testing Pamphlet for pregnant women and health providers about what to expect with a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome. This information is free and available in English and Spanish.

The situation in Iceland is a reminder of how important it is that Global continues to invest in medical care, education and advocacy, and that we continue to advance the world class research that is helping us better understand Down syndrome,” said Whitten.

In addition, below are specific facts about the condition in the United States:

  • Lifespan – Today, the average lifespan of a person with Down syndrome is nearly 60 years.
  • Termination Rates – The best available statistics in the U.S. are that an estimated 67 percent of women who receive an amniocentesis resulting in a positive test result for Down syndrome choose to terminate their pregnancies. But over 95 percent of pregnant women don’t even elect to receive an amniocentesis.
  • Medical Care & Research – There have been great strides in medical care and research that have doubled the lifespan of people with Down syndrome over the last 30 years.
  • Educational Opportunities – People with Down syndrome are included in public schools. Many complete high school, and increasing numbers are going to college or get vocational training.
  • Voting & Employment – Many people with Down syndrome work, volunteer and vote.
  • Marriage, Siblings & Self-advocates – Despite potential challenges, personal accounts and studies show most families that have a child with Down syndrome are stable, successful and happy, and that siblings often report having increased levels of compassion and empathy. One major study on marriages and Down syndrome shows that the divorce rate among parents of children with Down syndrome is lower than the national average.

For the most current, accurate information and resources associated with people with Down syndrome visit www.globaldownsyndrome.org/facts.

Global Down Syndrome Foundation (Global) is a nonpartisan, leading research, medical care and advocacy organization for people with Down syndrome. Global believes strongly that all Americans, including members of our community, must have access to affordable, high-quality healthcare and health insurance coverage appropriate for their needs. Global urges Senators to keep key patient protections and health insurance coverage that are part of current law in any Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare) replacement bill that is considered by the Senate.

We encourage the Senate to:

  • Ensure that people with pre-existing conditions like Down syndrome continue to have access to affordable, high-quality health insurance – regardless of whether or not they currently have insurance;
  • Protect federal funding for Medicaid to ensure that people who received coverage under previous expansions won’t lose their insurance;
  • Remove caps on federal contributions to state Medicaid programs – caps could result in persons losing coverage or those maintaining Medicaid coverage seeing a reduction in covered medical services and higher out-of-pocket costs; and
  • Continue the Affordable Care Act provision that allows children up to age 26 to stay on their parents’ health insurance policies.

Time is of the essence – the Senate may hold a vote on this legislation this week. We urge all Global Down Syndrome Foundation advocates to contact your Senators immediately and urge the Senate to allow for a full and open debate on their healthcare proposal and to oppose any plan that removes current patient protections and coverage for individuals with Down syndrome. As the debate on health care reform continues, Global is engaged with our friends in Congress to protect the health and wellbeing of all individuals with Down syndrome.

Thank you for your advocacy and support!


representative

Corresponding Phone Script:

“Hi. My name is _________ and I live in [Hometown, State].

“I’m a volunteer and advocate with the Global Down Syndrome Foundation. I am deeply concerned that the Senate version of the American Health Care Act will not include protections that are important for people with Down syndrome. In particular, I am concerned that this bill [1) doesn’t guarantee insurance coverage for people with preexisting conditions, 2) cuts federal funding for Medicaid expansion, 3) establishes caps on federal funding for Medicaid, and/or 4) would not allow people to stay on their parents’ health insurance plans up to age 26 – include one or more based on your specific concerns].

“I am also concerned that the public will not have enough time to review and provide feedback on this bill. I hope Senator ____ will work with [his/her] colleagues to make sure that there is ample time for debate and input on this bill.

“These healthcare protections are extremely important not only for people with Down syndrome, but for all Americans.

“Thank you.”

Global researches anchor T21RS International Conference

June 12th, 2017 by Global Down Syndrome Foundation

msw-t21Global Down Syndrome Foundation is a founding member of the T21 Research Society.  The Society is the first non-profit scientific organization of researchers studying Down syndrome, founded to promote basic and transnational research on Down syndrome and to apply new scientific knowledge to develop improved treatments and cures. After hosting a successful first conference in Paris, the society hosted a second conference in Chicago from June 7th to 11th.  A number of Global affiliated scientists and scholars were invited to present their groundbreaking research:

Joaquin Espinosa, PhD
Associate Director for Science at the Global affiliated Linda Crnic Institute for Down syndrome
Understanding Down syndrome as an Interferonpathy: Espinosa’s explains the implications for the understanding of leukemia and other co-morbidities driven by trisomy 21

Ann-Charlotte Granholm-Bently, PhD
Researcher for the Down Syndrome-Alzheimer’s Disease Investigator program powered by Global, Linda Crnic Institute and the National Alzheimer’s Association
Novel mechanisms in Down syndrome pathophysiology: Designer receptors reveal an important role for noradrenergic systems in Down syndrome pathology

Roger Reeves, PhD
T21 President and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome
Breakthrough and oral communication sessions: Reeves lecture focuses on a specialized pro-resolution mediator approach to chronic inflammation in the Ts654Dn mouse model of Down syndrome

Katherine Waugh, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow for the Crnic Institute
Flash Poster Presentation: Waugh’s presentation includes extensive perturbations of the immune system among individuals with Trisomy 21

Michelle Sie Whitten
Global President and CEO
Medical Policies for people with Down syndrome: Whitten discusses medical care for adults with Down syndrome and lifting barriers

Donna Willcock, PhD
Researcher for the Down Syndrome-Alzheimer’s Disease Investigator program powered by Global, Linda Crnic Institute and the national Alzheimer’s Association
Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease in Down syndrome: Wilcock shares how individuals with Down syndrome who have Alzheimer’s disease have a distinct neuroinflammatory phenotype compared to sporadic Alzheimer’s disease

Because Down syndrome research has generated findings that affect thinking regarding research on Alzheimer’s disease and solid tumor cancers, T21RS creates another forum for drawing attention to the need for further funding for Down syndrome research, which could in turn benefit everyone’s lives. Global and the Crnic Institute are at the forefront of this research and look forward to helping place a greater emphasis on collaborations worldwide.

The conference that presents the latest scientific developments in the field of Down syndrome research is powered by a dynamic team of scientists, researchers, and scholars from across the world:

Conference Organizers:

Roger Reeves, PhD
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Jean Delabar, PhD
CNRS-ICM

Mara Dierssen, MD, PhD
CRG-Center for Genomic Regulation

John O’Bryan, PhD
University of Illinois Chicago

Scientific Program Committee:

Mara Dierssen, MD, PhD- Chair
CRG-Center for Genomic Regulation

Anita Bhattacharyya, PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Cynthia Lemere, PhD
Harvard Medical School

Jean Delabar, PhD
CNRS-ICM

Dean Nizetic, MD, PhD
Nanyang Technological University Singapore

Jorge Busciglio, PhD
University of California-Irvine

Nicole Schupf, PhD, DrPH
Columbia University Medical Center

Pablo Caviedes, MD, PhD
University of Chile

Deny Menghini, PhD
Bambino Gesu Children’s Hospital

For more info on T21RS, visit T21RS.org.